Why I choose to write about COVID-19

I am commissioned to write two articles on COVID-19 and missionary work in Asia and Europe. As I write those articles and others, I wanted to give you an idea about why I chose this topic.

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Beautiful little stream near our hotel in Su’ao, Taiwan.

Around the first of March 2020, as the world was learning just how bad COVID-19 was getting, I was struggling to find a vision for my writing. I had a great nonfiction project going with my church’s teaching pastor (still going, actually), but my fiction writing was dying on the vine and I hadn’t written an article that sold since May 2018. I’d lost my original focus somewhere.

Which led to my first reason for writing about COVID-19. I needed to calm down, get back to writing what I love, and find people to serve. While the world is awash in competing claims about the virus, I felt that maybe missionaries were not being written about as much as they should be, so I focused on that. That has led to two article projects as of this writing, and I have plans for more (hopefully).

Another reason is that the writer in me is still skeptical that we’re getting the whole picture. I don’t know if we’ll ever get there, and I’m certainly not going to be the person who breaks it open. I don’t know if it’s the “liberal media” stirring things up, or the Chinese Communist Party trying to keep their economy intact while blowing it out of proportion to drive competing western economies down, or what it is, but I just feel something in my gut that isn’t square.

Again, I don’t expect to be the person who will figure it all out. Nevertheless, it’s spurred me to do what I can in a situation like this, which is to look for stories to tell that might help people understand the overall situation better. That’s one of the reasons I picked to specifically talk about missionary work in light of COVID-19.

Finally, but certainly not least, I need to be humbled about my writing. I keep having grand visions for my work, and I keep having to be reminded that God gives success and failure, and that I need to just do the next indicated step. I’m his servant, so I need to focus on being that. COVID-19 reporting will not make me famous. Plenty of bigger names are already covering that. But it is a way for me to serve.

I look forward to what I will learn as I write about this interesting situation as it continues to unfold.

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Beijing doesn’t want your Bibles

China has made a move that most dispensationalist Christians would say they’ve seen coming for years. Beijing has banned online sales of the Bible in a move certain to put additional pressure on the Chinese underground church. You can read the NYTimes article here.

With Christianity’s gradual increase in China, though our faith still only makes up roughly 6-10% of the total population, the communist government has continued to ramp up its plans to dampen the fire. A regulation preventing the sale of Bibles online (they are already heavily regulated in physical form) is just the latest move. China used to meet the underground church with blunt force, often arresting pastors and levying fines against parishioners. In more modern times, Chinese authorities pressure discovered churches to join the Three-Self Patriotic Movement (China’s authorized church).

I’ve read the tenants of this authorized faith and on the surface, it doesn’t sound half bad.  However, my biggest concern is that the state authorized church means that the state, which is certainly not friendly toward Christ and his church, can stamp it out any time it pleases. More likely, of course, is that it just keeps the communist thumb on them to prevent the sort of growth that appears to be happening in the underground church.

According to the NYTimes article, a Vatican source suggests that this could be the opening salvo in a new, broader crackdown. Again, the dispensationalists would have no problem believing this to be true. As a premillennialist, I certainly believe this is very possible. While China has been fairly open on some economic issues in order to become the powerhouse that Russia could never be, Beijing has not shown the same interest in religious matters.

China is listed as #43 on the Open Doors World Watch List for 2018. One would assume that it will at least hold on to that number with a move like this, or even move up a number of slots. I’ll update this as further events unfold.

I should add that I don’t want this to scare or anger any of my readers. Our ultimate (and only) hope is in God. I do not believe he is surprised by any of this. Indeed, as a premillennialist, I believe that he is fully aware of every move that the Chinese government is making, just as he is aware of the Soviet efforts before them. I am not advocating any action on our part except to pray for those affected. We do not know them, but we are brothers and sisters and will get to meet them someday. It is our duty and our privilege, and as such I call on all Christian believers to pray for those affected by the curtailment of Bible sales in China.

A final thought as I close: America is beginning its slow move to this end as well. Bibles are still easily available, but I’ll show you tomorrow just how fragile the situation is becoming in America.

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