Fussy Librarian Ad Campaign

This is a special post for other small-time writers like me who are trying to figure out ad campaigns. In this post, I focus on Fussy Librarian with a note on Bookbub. 

I’m intrigued by the name Fussy Librarian alone, so of course I wanted to test the service. Since Saving Ebenezer isn’t ready yet, I ran my test case on The Dirty Campaign, which I use as a sort of reader magnet, in that I keep it in KDP Select so that I can make it free periodically.

First of all, Fussy Librarian is really easy to use. Since it’s a smaller-scale service, setup is easy and you’ll likely find your book one of only a few books being recommended on a particular day. It still goes out to several thousand potential readers, so don’t let the smallness affect your decision-making. Fussy Librarian charged me $22 for the freebie ad, which looked like this:

Screen Shot 2019-07-28 at 4.18.19 PM

When I ran this test campaign on the 25th of June, I was on business travel to Belgium, so I got home from work just as my target audience was getting started on their day. When I saw 150 downloads, I freaked out. I was already calling Fussy a success. I went to dinner and came back and it was at around 450, and I nearly started crying. After waking up in the morning (when America was headed to bed), I crested 716 downloads and #2 in the Christian Suspense category on Amazon. Fussy Librarian did so much more than I planned for it to do.

I was able to track the effects of Fussy Librarian over the few days after the ad. The following day, 138 people downloaded the novelette. That was almost certainly due to being in the top five in its category since no advertising went out that day. Some downloads might have been folks going back to the previous day’s Fussy Librarian ad, but I suspect most were from being #2 on the list. These additional downloads helped The Dirty Campaignto make it to #1 in its category on the 26thof June.

It also led directly to my first review on Amazon (a 4-star) and an additional ranking on Goodreads. I also got 106 total KNEP pages read, so that was nice as well.

On the 27th, an additional 42 people downloaded my story. The novelette had slipped outside the top 5 by now, but it was still nice. My BookBub ad started showing this day.

Turns out that BookBub is harder to figure out than I’d first thought. Fussy was easy because I was the only email out that day. Not so with Bookbub.

Despite editing the ad during the time it was alive, and allowing for a higher bid (I went above the average bid in the evening of the first day), BookBub was a disappointment. I only had 974 impressions resulting in 0 clicks. This means that BB was not responsible for any of the 920 The Dirty Campaign downloads.

I didn’t even get enough impressions to be charged for my ad (I allowed for up to $22 to match what I did with The Fussy Librarian). Guess that’s nice, but I was willing to bid enough for each click that it would have quickly spent my money if they’d shown it more.

At first, I was upset. It shouldn’t be this hard when I’m offering to throw money at the problem. Then, after thinking it through, I realized that this is a learning opportunity. I’m trying to build a future in writing. To do so, I need to learn the ins and outs of marketing, which just happened to be easier this time with Fussy Librarian.

Having said all of that, the Fussy Librarian ad for the day it wasn’t free, I got zero purchases (Ad for a non-freebie cost $14). So what that means for me is that Fussy Librarian was really, really good as a freebie, but not as good for a non-discount/free day. I’ll test it again when my next KDP Select day opens up for The Dirty Campaign.

In contrast, while I still didn’t get in front of nearly as many people with my Bookbub ad (again, matching the $14 ad cost for The Fussy Librarian) on a non-freebie day, I did get one download. It’s all part of the learning process!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s